Hawaii Newspaper Columnist Eddie Sherman Dies at 89

Hawaii Newspaper Columnist Eddie Sherman Dies at 89

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Eddie Sherman

Editor’s note: Well-known Hawaii newspaper columnist Eddie Sherman died Tuesday night. Sherman, who was born on February 22, 1924, worked for a number of news organizations including MidWeek Publications and Honolulu Advertiser. A friend of his, Patrick Brent, wrote this story after learning Sherman had died Tuesday.

BY PT BRENT – If ever there was import from that big island called America, who earned his “kama’aina” stripes, it would Mr. Eddie Sherman.

Since 1956, Eddie has been one of the premier journalists in Hawaii – clearly of the same caliber as New York’s Walter Winchell and the other mainland greats.

He was known as the Dean of Honolulu journalists writing for the Honolulu Advertiser and in later years for MidWeek Magazine. He set the bar for three-dot journalism.

Think about the “dash” between Eddie’s 89 years: 1924-2013.  That dash kicks off at a boy’s orphanage in Boston, enlists in the U.S. Coast Guard and travels to our beautiful islands on December 7, 1941, in time to help rebuild the Navy’s broken fleet at their Pearl Harbor shipyard.

Eddie moved on to be radio announcer, journalist, comedian, entertainer, and TV star (a Hawaii 5-0 original), Most of all, he became the beloved husband of Patty Sherman… and he always said: “I married UP”

Eddie’s spirit lives on in his many written works. Eddie’s book “Frank, Sammy, Marlon & Me” is a must read classic.

Eddie as a journalist met and befriended countless celebrities from John Wayne to Frank Sinatra and from Marlon Brando to Jim Nabors – all considered Eddie to be more than a news reporter. Simply stated they just like being with him.

Eddie had that gift that made people comfortable. They trusted him with their stories.  To most celebrities, Eddie was “Mister Hawaii”, he owned the heartbeat and the tempo of the islands.

Sharing this with our most well known stars from Elvis Presley to Bob Hope and from Sophia Loren to Don Ho.

He wrote only positive press and took umbrage with any attempts to alter that policy… ask his editors.

Eddie leaves behind much more than his many columns … the legacy he really leaves behind is woven into the fabric and the lives of the countless people that he touched.  They all feel special… this author does.

He was a dot dot dot one-of-a-kind treasure.  Now Eddie is busy sharing his sparkling stories with Sinatra and Brando –  upstairs.

 

P.T. Brent is a Hawaii resident who calls himself  “an Eddie …  Sherman protégé’”

 

Fort Apache, Afghanistan

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F O R T    A P A C H E    AFGHANISTAN by P.T. Brent 15 August 2012

In the past few days our Corps lost six Marines in Afghanistan – scant news coverage – what is the matter with us?

“Any future defense secretary who advises the president to again send a big American land army into Asia or into the Middle East or Africa should have his head examined.”
A candid remark from: Secretary of Defense Robert Gates
before leaving office in July 2011 Continue reading

Fort Apache, Afghanistan

ft-apache

F O R T    A P A C H E    AFGHANISTAN by P.T. Brent 15 August 2012

In the past few days our Corps lost six Marines in Afghanistan – scant news coverage – what is the matter with us?

“Any future defense secretary who advises the president to again send a big American land army into Asia or into the Middle East or Africa should have his head examined.”
A candid remark from: Secretary of Defense Robert Gates
before leaving office in July 2011 Continue reading

Notre Dame VIP

A University, once virtually unknown has once again cast its shadow far A University, at one time, virtually unknown, has once again cast its shadow far across the globe. Enter the tiny Leper colony of Kalaupapa Hawaii.
Clearly, on the bucket list for Father Monk Malloy, Monk Malloy  accompanied by a small following of Irish faithful from the Honolulu ND club hiked the treacherous sea cliffs filled with slimy rocks, mud and confronted by an ocean crashing 1600 feet below.  Trekked down into this small corner of the Island of Molokai.  Father Malloy brought home two scarred knees to attestation  to his warrior spirit.
Why this arduous effort ?
One compelling reason is to revisit the lives of the two of the Catholic Church’s newest saints.  Saint Damien, SS.CC. and Saint Marianne Cope,O.S.F. who unstintingly devoted their lives to  these abandoned souls.   Here, Father Malloy will say a mass in Father Damien small church and pray for the few remaining residents on the island.
Sad reflections:
Starting in 1866 with nine men and three women were allegedly tossed overboard and told to swim for shore.  The colony eventually housed more than 8000 people. Cut off from the rest of the world by 1600-foot cliffs on one side and ocean on the other, Kalaupapa, Molokai, is a naturally beautiful prison.
At its peak, about 1,200 men, women, and children were in exile in this island prison. The isolation law was enacted by King Kamehameha V and remained in effect until 1969, when it was finally repealed. Today, about fourteen former sufferers of leprosy (now known as Hansen’s Disease) continue to live there. The colony is now part of Kalaupapa National Historical Park.  The saving grace may have been the arrival of 33 year – old Belgian missionary Father Damien de Veuster in 1873. De Veuster lived and worked in the colony and finally contracted the disease himself.  Before his death in 1889, described himself as “the happiest missionary in the world”.  His work at Kalaupapa has been recognized as a model of compassionate care and was canonized as a saint by the Catholic Church in October of 2009.
The contemporary mission was to do a few days of repair work to the home of the nuns on the island.  The Notre Dame Alumni from Hawaii donated all tools, supplies and food necessary for the task.  Their president Lester Goo took on the onerous burden of making it all happen – no small feat.
Notre Dame’s President emeritus joined the ranks of men such as Robert Luis Stevenson who visited several times and donated a piano and as well as a poem.  Robert Louis Stevenson believed Damien was a saint and predicted that the Church would one day canonize him.
To the Reverend Sister Marianne
Matron of the Bishop Home, Kalaupapa.
To see the infinite pity of this place,
the mangled limbs, the devastated faces,
The innocent sufferers smiling at the rod,
A fool were tempted to deny his God.
He sees, and shrinks; but if he look again,
Lo, beauty springing from the breasts of pain!
He marks the sisters on the painful shores,
RLS
Sister Marianne Cope Pray for us
Father Damien pray for us
Apostles of the lepers pray for us
Before his death in 1889, described himself as “the happiest missionary in the world”.
Where does our society find such extraordinary human beings?    ptb
The contemporary mission was to do a few days of repair work to the home of the nuns on the island.  The Notre Dame Alumni from Hawaii donated all tools, supplies and food necessary for the task. Their president Lester Goo took on the onerous burden of making it all happen – no small feat
Notre Dame’s President emeritus joined the ranks of men such as Robert Luis Stevenson (RLS)  who visited several times and donated a piano and as well as a poem.  Robert Louis Stevenson believed Damien was a saint and predicted that the Church would one day canonize him.
To the Reverend Sister Marianne
Matron of the Bishop Home, Kalaupapa.
To see the infinite pity of this place,
The mangled limb, the devastated face,
The innocent sufferers smiling at the rod,
A fool were tempted to deny his God. 
He sees, and shrinks; but if he look again,
Lo, beauty springing from the breasts of pain!
He marks the sisters on the painful shores,
RLS

Sister Marianne Cope Pray for us

Father Damien pray for us

Apostles of the lepers pray for us

Amen

P.T. Brent Hawaii

The Sound of Freedom

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The Sound of Freedom
Dispatches from the War on Terrorism
By P. T. Brent, 6/25/2004 7:55:02 AM

The Marine choppers, air force C 5’s C 17’s and C 130’s were taking off last night when I recorded this report. The sounds are deafening from a tent alongside the runways at Baghdad International Airport temporary airbase of the “CPA. The” people at the Coalition Provisional Authority military call it “BIAP” (bee – op). As one Marine, a Texan once said: “be happy, that is the sound of freedom you are hearing.” Continue reading

The Japanese Alamo

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The Japanese Alamo
Combat Notebook: Dispatches from the War on Terrorism
By P. T. Brent, 7/2/2004 9:00:33 AM

Iwo Jima – Marine and Navy pilots, 59 years ago, called it “a charred pork chop.” From the sky in a Marine Corsair this sulfuric volcanic island is dramatically different from what was experienced by Marine infantry on these black coral beaches. The 3rd, 4th, & 5th Marine Divisions encountered horrific casualties when attacking this now legendary rock. A miniscule island comprised of only seven and one half square miles, it was smaller than Santa Monica, California. A task force of 495 ships gathered, more than our current Navy now has in totality, assembled off shore awaiting orders to “land the landing force.” Continue reading

The Grey Ghost

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The Grey Ghost
Dispatches from the War on Terrorism
By P. T. Brent, 9/24/2004 12:49:21 AM

“We have done so much with so little, for so long; we now feel we can do everything with nothing.” Ref: USMC’s tight budget (Col. J.R. Bates, USMC)
While Corporate America is jetting from one mega deal to the next board meeting, The U.S. Marines have adopted the Corporate Jet into the war on terrorism. Considerably a leaner & meaner model, the Marines have taken a tornado damaged G4 and for a third the cost of the new executive version converted it into a working member of the Corps’ air power. This G4 based in Hawaii has none of the luxurious amenities of its counterparts. Marines have pallets of supplies and gear aboard and communication systems for war fighting. No luxuries, they even bring their own personal water and chow. The pace aboard is 24/7 and would wear out the toughest of Fortune Five Hundred executives. They land in far off climes and exit with helmets, flak jackets, and weapons at the ready. All this capability is at a fraction of the cost of a Corporate G4 model. The Grey Ghost bears little resemblance to the famous civil war general John Mosley. Continue reading

Beans, Bullets and Bandages and the Red Ball Express

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Beans, Bullets and Bandages and the Red Ball Express
Dispatches from the War on Terrorism
By P. T. Brent, 9/17/2004 9:24:25 AM

In WWII the army was re-supplied by the “Red Ball Express” a euphemism for a transportation convoy company that kept the troops supplied with the essentials to life in combat, such as beans, bullets and bandages. Continue reading